August – The Sturgeon Moon

Welcome to the eighth in a series of posts about the names of full moons. If you missed the others, you can click the following links.

August Sturgeon Moon
An August Full Moon

The August Moon is known as the Sturgeon Moon. The sturgeon of the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain were said to be most readily caught during this full Moon. Other names include Black Cherries Moon, Mountain Shadows Moon, and Ricing Moon.

Interesting Facts

  • According to Farmer’s Almanac, a blue moon refers to the second of two Full Moons in the same month. It can also refer to the emergence of four, instead of three Full Moons in a “season,” defined as the period between a Solstice and an Equinox. When this occurs, the third of the four Moons is considered the Blue Moon.
  • Native American names for the full moons vary from tribe to tribe, hence the reason for several names.
  • A bit of family history. My brother once hiked through Grand Canyon by the light of an August moon. He started on the north rim and came out on the south rim. He planned his visit to coincide with the full moon.
  • Folklore says that babies born the day after the full Moon enjoy success and endurance.
  • This month’s Sturgeon Moon occurrs on August 22.
  • This is also a seasonal blue moon. There are various definitions of a blue moon (see above).In this case, this year’s August moon is the third of four full moons to occur during the summer season.

Superstition

There is a legend that says if a member of the family dies during a blue moon, three more will follow. I once wrote a short story titled The Blue Moon Murders based upon this superstition.

Do you ever make plans according to the phase of the moon? I’d love to hear about your adventures.

37 thoughts on “August – The Sturgeon Moon

    1. Probably not, Karen. He’s written a few short pieces but he says he’d never publish anything because he never stops editing!

      You’ve given me an idea. I need to write some if his stories so the family will have them to pass down. I regret not doing that with my mom. I only have my memory of those stories to rely on.

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  1. I read my horoscope every day and the astrologer always mentions full moons and dark moons, so he makes me think about them. My daughter’s a nurse and swears people get cranked up during full moons.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I really enjoy this series, Joan. Since Mae mentioned it, I had to look up the moon phase for my date of birth. One website said it was a full moon, but another said it was a waning gibbous. I sound more like that description than full, lol.

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  3. I love these posts, Joan. Your brother sounds a lot like one of my sons. He hikes/climbs up and down mountains across the U.S. and beyond (and races on his bicycle). Your brother’s approach with a full moon is amazing. 😊

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  4. I love your brother made a Grand Canyon hike by the light of a full moon! This is such a fun series where I’m learning new moon facts:) Thanks, Joan.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I don’t plan anything based on moon phase but folklore reference you mentioned made me curious of the moon phase for the day of my birth. I looked up the lunar calendar for that year and date and it turns out it was a waning gibbous. Interesting!

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  6. I love your moon lore posts, Joan! And this year, I’ll get to enjoy the Sturgeon Moon on my birthday. I know it’s not full, full until the 22nd, but it will be full enough for me to enjoy on the 21st!

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  7. My husband is an amateur astronomer. He makes plans according to a full moon (to AVOID them as they make it hard to see the planets and nebulas beyond). But me, I don’t make any plans by them. I just think of moon phases as another way Nature marks the passage of time.

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    1. My brother was (and still is) quite the adventurer. That summer, he rode a bicycle from San Antonio, Texas to Moab, Utah. It’s around 1000 miles. A friend met him in Moab where they drove to the north rim of the canyon. Then the friend picked him up on the south rim. Needless to say, he had lots of stories from that trip.

      Liked by 1 person

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